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Senior Safety: 3 Tips to Avoid "Grandparent" Scams

May 17, 2016 12:54 am

Swindlers hoping to make off with someone else’s money often target unwitting seniors in “grandparent” scams. These schemes, according to the American Bankers Association (ABA), victimize thousands of seniors—and their loved ones—each year.

The scenario, the ABA says, starts with the senior receiving a phone call from a purported family member in what appear to be dire circumstances. The pseudo-family member requests that money be sent immediately, often through wire transfer, to rectify the situation.

To avoid falling prey to these tricks, the ABA advises:

Refusing to provide personal information – In general, it is wise not to relay any personal information over the phone. If you suspect a scam, take care not to offer up any indentifying or financial information.

Proceeding with caution – Scammers use sophisticated means, including social media, to obtain personal information about a target’s family or friends. Take precautionary measures, including confirming the call with another family member and/or requesting to call the scammer back, before agreeing to any action.

Asking several questions – The more questions you ask, the less likely a trickster will see the scheme through. Don’t hesitate to ask questions—doing so can even derail the con completely.

Listening to your gut – Let your instincts guide you. If something feels amiss, say no and hang up the phone immediately. Avoid rushing into a decision at all costs.

“Fraudsters have no problem preying on your goodwill to get inside your wallet,” says Corey Carlisle, executive director of the ABA Foundation. “They’re using social media and Internet searches to fabricate convincing stories, so be careful, trust your gut and do your best to confirm who you’re dealing with before sending any money.”

Source: ABA

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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